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Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a form of hair loss that typically affects people of African descent. It is a progressive condition characterized by the destruction of the hair follicles which leads to permanent hair loss. CCCA is believed to be caused by an overactive inflammatory response triggered by certain hairstyling practices. The condition can also be associated with other medical conditions such as lupus and lichen planus, or it can occur on its own. It usually begins at the crown of the scalp, where affected individuals often experience scarring, itching and burning sensations. Treatment typically includes a combination of topical and oral medications, as well as lifestyle changes to help reduce inflammation and prevent further damage to the hair follicles. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a type of scarring alopecia, which is a group of hair loss disorders. It is characterized by progressive hair loss from the crown of the scalp. This type of hair loss can be caused by inflammation and/or follicular damage due to thermal or chemical treatments (e.G., hot combs, relaxers, straighteners). CCCA results in permanent and irreversible hair loss in affected areas and may cause scarring along with it. It is more common in women of African descent, but can occur in other ethnic backgrounds as well.

Causes of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA)

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a form of hair loss that primarily affects African American women. This type of hair loss is characterized by a progressive decrease in the diameter and number of hairs, resulting in a scarred scalp with an absence of hair. While the exact cause of CCCA is unknown, there are several factors that may contribute to its development.

Genetics

Genetics may play a role in the development of CCCA. Studies have shown that individuals with a family history of CCCA are more likely to develop this condition than those without a family history. Additionally, researchers have identified certain genetic variations associated with this type of hair loss.

Hormones

Hormonal imbalances can also contribute to the development of CCCA. Studies have shown that individuals with higher levels of androgens (male hormones) are more likely to develop this condition than those with lower levels, indicating that hormones may play a role in its development. Additionally, changes in the levels of estrogen (female hormones) have also been linked to this type of hair loss.

Environmental Factors

Environmental factors such as sun exposure and chemical treatments may also contribute to the development of CCCA. Prolonged exposure to ultraviolet radiation from the sun can damage the scalp and increase the risk for this type of hair loss. Chemical treatments such as relaxers and bleaches can also damage the scalp and increase the risk for CCCA.

Stress

Stress has been linked to many different health conditions, including CCCA. Studies have shown that individuals who experience chronic stress are more likely to develop this type of hair loss than those who do not experience chronic stress. Additionally, psychological stress has been associated with increased levels of hormones which can lead to increased hair shedding and thinning, resulting in CCCA over time.

In conclusion, there are several potential causes for central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA). These include genetics, hormonal imbalances, environmental factors such as sun exposure and chemical treatments, as well as stress.

Symptoms of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA)

Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) is a hair loss condition that affects primarily people of African descent. It can cause patches of baldness on the scalp that may slowly spread over time. While the condition is not serious, it can be embarrassing and cause emotional distress. The following are some of the symptoms associated with CCCA:

• Bald patches: The most common symptom of CCCA is one or more round or oval-shaped bald patches on the scalp. These patches are usually smooth and symmetrical, and they can range in size from small to large.

• Hair thinning: CCCA may also cause hair to become thinner and finer over time as it progresses. This thinning usually occurs around the edges of the bald patches, making them more noticeable.
• Scalp itching: Some people with CCCA experience itching on their scalp that can be mild or intense. This itching usually occurs before the bald patches appear, but it can also continue afterward.
• Scalp burning: In some cases, people with CCCA experience a burning sensation on their scalp that may worsen when exposed to hot temperatures or when brushing their hair.
• Hair discoloration: People with CCCA may also notice their hair changing color from its original shade to a lighter one or even becoming grayish-white in color as it thins out due to the condition.
• Hair breakage: As CCCA progresses, it can cause brittle and easily breakable hairs that are more prone to falling out than normal hairs would be.
• Alopecia totalis: In some cases, CCCA can progress into alopecia totalis, which is complete baldness of the scalp. While this is rare, it is possible for people with CCCA to experience complete hair loss if left untreated for too long.

Diagnosis of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA)

The diagnosis of Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia (CCCA) is a process that involves both clinical observation and laboratory testing. In order to accurately diagnose CCCA, the physician must consider the patientstrong class=”cr_highlight”>

 

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